Monday, September 5, 2016

Learning to Be Proud of Who Your Child Is Becoming

...Instead of Feeling Ashamed of the Parent Your Illness Forces You to Be
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"You know people love you in your life,
but you don't know how much until you get sick."
Hoda Kotb, Today Show Host & Cancer Survivor
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READER SUBMISSIONS REQUESTED

HELP me write a new MWCI article: “Learning to Be Proud of Who Your Child Is Becoming Instead of Feeling Ashamed of the Parent Your Illness Forces You to Be.”

Please share examples of your child being a sweet, loving caregiver to you or another person or child who needs love in the COMMENTS BELOW or EMAIL THEM to MWCI at momwithchronicillness.org@gmail.com. There is no limit to how many examples you can share. I will then write the article using your examples as undeniable evidence that growing up with a chronically ill or in pain Mom is not detrimental to a child’s development, but is in fact quite the opposite. (Of course, I am not claiming that children who are not exposed to daily illness and pain can’t still be just as loving and caring as anyone).

This is your chance to gush about who your babies are becoming because of your illness, not in spite of it, and to help other mothers be PROUD of the *positive effects* parenting with a chronic or severe illness and pain can have on our children instead of just feeling ashamed of the parents our illnesses and pain force us to be.

Please indicate whether you want your first name and diagnosis used or if you prefer “Anonymous.” If no indication is given, “Anonymous” will automatically be used. ***No last names, email address or screen names will be shared on the site or with anyone: all your info will remain 100% PRIVATE!*** No child’s name or picture will be shared on the MWCI website regardless of indications to do otherwise. I’ll leave one of my examples below.

"The first time I saw it in my little girl was when she was about 2 years old. She asked if we could play outside, and I told her that she could go out and play in the yard, but that I was sorry, I would have to watch her from inside because because my tummy hurt. She ran to the bathroom and came back with a band-aid. She opened it, took the band-aid out, lifted my shirt, and very carefully put the band-aid on my tummy just right

Then she looked at me with a big smile and asked, "Can we go outside now?" I couldn't say no. With tears in my eyes and a big smile on my own face, I put on an adult diaper, took some extra meds (ssh...) and we went outside to play for a while. That was the moment I knew I was raising a caring, loving, thoughtful, kind, proactive and smart child who would grow up to be a caring, loving, thoughtful, kind, proactive and smart adult."
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Submitted by Megan, Ulcerative Colitis